April 22, 2019

Archives for October 2012

Ontario Dental Association pleads guilty in case

By: Bob Vrbanac (Staff), Waterloo Chronicle, Waterloo, Ontario 31-Oct-2012 — ODA pleads guilty in case.

The Ontario Dental Association pleaded guilty Friday to contravening the Ontario Municipal Elections Act in the run up to the fluoridation referendum in 2010.

The ODA reached a plea deal in Provincial Offences Court for failing to register as a referendum participant before incurring expenses related to attending a debate on water fluoridation held at the Hauser Haus at the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex.

That included producing materials promoting the Ontario Dental Association’s pro-water fluoridation position that were made available to the public at the June 17, 2010 meeting.

Robert Fleming, executive director of WaterlooWatch and the elected president of Canadians Opposed to Fluoridation, swore out charges against ODA, stating it had contravened Section 94 of the Municipal Elections Act.

Provincial prosecutors proceeded with the charges against the ODA and the past-presidents of the organization Dr. Ira Kirshen and local dentist Dr. Harry Hoediono, who both attended the debate.

Justice Arthur Child ruled against a motion made by the Ontario Dental Association and the two dentists to dismiss the case at the end of August and set a trial date for Nov. 13.

A plea agreement was reached in the case last Thursday night. As part of the plea bargain charges against the two dentists were withdrawn after the ODA admitted guilt. The association was given a suspended sentence and wasn’t fined.

Fleming said he hoped the case would go to court and clear up some of the claims that were made during preliminary deliberations.

The case turned ugly with accusations that the charges were frivolous and vexatious. Defense attorney Murray Stieber also produced a sworn affidavit by Hoediono, saying he was intimidated during the referendum and the campaign of intimidation continued.

Fleming said he also was hoping to put some of the ODA’s scientific claims about the benefits of water fluoridation to the test, but had to settle with what might be an important precedent.

“In the interest of having just one fluoridation referendum, charges against the Ontario Dental Association were sworn out early during the campaign period, and I am pleased the ODA plead guilty to the charges as laid,” said Fleming. “The local municipal democratic process was successfully protected.

“For the last two years the ODA has been unsuccessful in proving the charges were unfounded, meritless, intimidation and abuse of process. Just as the evidence and merits of the case were about to be heard, the ODA suddenly plead guilty.

“While justice was served, I suspect the ODA leaders remain as arrogant and evasive today as they were two years ago.”

In what proved to be a tight referendum vote, the citizens of Waterloo voted to end the practice of water fluoridation by a narrow 50.3 per cent margin on Oct. 25, 2010. While the vote wasn’t binding, politicians respected the results and ended the addition of fluoride to the water for the first time since 1967.

http://www.waterloochronicle.ca/news/oda-pleads-guilty-in-case/

 

SEE RELATED ARTICLE: http://cof-cof.ca/2012/11/oda-continues-to-support-water-fluoridation-re-oda-pleads-guilty-in-case-oct-31-waterloo-chronicle/

SEE RELATED NEWS VIDEO: http://cof-cof.ca/2012/10/ontario-dental-association-pleads-guilty/

SEE RELATED NEWS VIDEO: http://cof-cof.ca/2011/12/controversy-over-last-falls-referendum-on-the-fluoridation-of-water-in-waterloo-ontario-made-its-way-to-court-this-morning/

SEE RELATED CARTOON: http://cof-cof.ca/cartoon-public-voice-and-dental-association/

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 31-Oct-2012

Anti-fluoride expert appears before Sedgwick County commission

By: Dion Lefler, The Wichita Eagle, Kansas.com, Wichita, Kansas 31-Oct-2012

A chemistry professor who is against fluoridated water got a much warmer welcome at the Sedgwick County Commission than a pro-fluoride expert who spoke there two weeks ago.

Commissioners Jim Skelton and Richard Ranzau aggressively questioned and argued with Bill Maas, a former public health director with the Centers for Disease Control, who was brought to Wichita to help present the case for fluoride in mid-October.

Wednesday, Skelton expressed agreement with Paul Connett, a chemistry professor, author of an anti-fluoride book and leader of the Fluoride Action Network. He also invited Connett to give his opinions on genetically manipulated food, which Connett opposes.

“You will not see a mouse mate with a strawberry,” Connett said. “And there are very good reasons for that.”

Skelton said he wished he could show clips from the movie “Dr. Strangelove.” In the cold-war era Peter Sellers comedy, a US Air Force general orders his nuclear-armed bombers to attack the Soviet Union after becoming convinced that fluoridated water is a communist plot to sap America’s “precious bodily fluids.”

Connett told the board that the CDC is wrong about fluoride being either safe or effective. And he said the national laboratory’s recommendations have unduly influenced local health officials to favor fluoride.

Connett said the CDC recommendations on fluoride come from only a small unit within the mammoth complex of laboratories in Atlanta.

But he said it takes a brave soul for a health official to challenge the CDC’s recommendations on fluoride.

Among fluoride supporters, “protecting this policy has now become more important than protecting the health of the people,” he said.

Wichita voters will decide whether to fluoridate their water in Tuesday’s election.

The question was brought to the ballot by a petition drive led by a coalition of doctors and dentists who say it would reduce costs and pain from preventable tooth decay.

The county has no role in the vote, but opened the door to commission meetings becoming a fluoride forum when the county Health Department posted an online fact sheet about fluoride based on CDC information.

Fluoride opponents pressured county officials to remove the flier from the website, which has been done.

Mark Gietzen, a leader of the anti-fluoridation campaign, went before the commission Wednesday and demanded that the county publish a correction in The Eagle or other media.

The commission took no action on Gietzen’s request.

http://www.kansas.com/2012/10/31/2552075/anti-fluoride-expert-appears-before.html

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 30-Oct-2012

Leading fluoride critic speaks in Wichita

By: Brian Heap, KWCH 12 Eyewitness News, Wichita, Kansas 29-Oct-2012

One of the world’s leading voices against fluoridation is bringing his message to Wichita, one week ahead of the citywide vote.

Dr. Paull Connett is a former chemistry professor turned leader of a non-profit that’s spreading awareness about the “harmful consequences of Community Water Fluoridation.”

“If you want fluoride, brush it on your teeth and spit it out,” Connett told a small group of voters gathered at a neighborhood health food store Monday.

Connett is in Wichita for a series of lectures, including an appearance before the Sedgwick County Commission Wednesday.

Connett said he believes science is on the side of those opposed to fluoridation.  He said government agencies and medical and dental associations will try to hide or discredit research and that’s why he came.

“It’s in black and white.  It’s documented.  They don’t have the science on their side.  They have the power on their side.  They have money,” he said.

Connett said fluoride has only a “topical” benefit for teeth and produces no other health benefits to people.  He believes a great deal more research is needed on the possible side effects of adding fluoride to the water.

“The people at the very top are scared if fluoridation fails it will be a massive loss of credibility,” he said.  “They’re worried about losing the public’s trust for other major public health programs.”

Connett will be speaking Monday evening at 7:00 pm at Wichita State University’s Hubbard Hall.  He has another lecture scheduled Tuesday at 6:30 pm at Murdock Theatre, 536 N. Broadway.

http://www.kwch.com/news/kwch-bh-news-leading-fluoride-critic-speaks-in-wichita-20121029,0,7594035.story

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 29-Oct-2012

Some questions about the safety of ingesting fluoride

By: Michelle Black, OttawaCitizen.com, Ottawa, Ontario 29-Oct-2012

As a practising dental hygienist, I have taken a keen interest in fluoride throughout my career, more so recently as I’ve become concerned about what affect chemicals in personal products, including toothpaste might have on my body.

So when the City of Ottawa says it’s safe to drink our municipal tap water, which includes fluoride, I wondered if that was true.

We’re told it’s deemed safe for everyone to consume. Doesn’t matter how much we ingest, how old we are, where we live or if we have health problems.

I questioned this because, in my 18 years as a dental hygienist, I’ve seen evidence of excessive fluoride ingestion on people’s teeth and I know how brown patches on a teen’s teeth can affect their mental health. I know if people use formula to feed their baby I’m to advise against use of tap water. It can contain 250 times more than nature passes on through breast milk.

I know there are places like China and India where the naturally occurring fluoride in water is crippling bones and has destroyed teeth. Only eight countries in the world actually fluoridate tap water. The citizens of these countries also have the distinction of having the highest rates of arthritis and thyroid disease, both side effects of excessive ingestion of fluoride.

Dr. Hardy Limebeck, past president of the Canadian Association of Dental Research, has publicly spoken out about their scientific findings, revealing that it’s not necessary to be ingested, that its purpose is better served when applied directly to the tooth.

Dr. Paul Connett, professor emeritus in Chemistry at St. Lawrence College in Caton, N.Y. is another scientist who has spoken out publicly against the need to put fluoride in municipal water.

So my natural inclination is to encourage people to improve their oral health by daily care, including brushing two to three times per day, with a soft toothbrush and floss at least once.

Watching what and when you eat is important as well.

A dental professional is well-positioned to assess the risk of decay and whether there is a need for fluoride. But I’m still on the fence about the “safety” of ingesting it.

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Some+questions+about+safety+ingesting+fluoride/7461653/story.html

Some questions about the safety of ingesting fluoride

A dental hygienist is well positioned to assess a person's risk of tooth decay, says letter writer Michelle Black. Photograph by: Jean Levac, Ottawa Citizen

By: Michelle Black (Opinion), The Ottawa Citizen, Ottawa, Ontario 29-Oct-2012 – Re: City dismisses fears over fluoride in water, Oct. 20.

As a practising dental hygienist, I have taken a keen interest in fluoride throughout my career, more so recently as I’ve become concerned about what affect chemicals in personal products, including toothpaste might have on my body.

So when the City of Ottawa says it’s safe to drink our municipal tap water, which includes fluoride, I wondered if that was true.

We’re told it’s deemed safe for everyone to consume. Doesn’t matter how much we ingest, how old we are, where we live or if we have health problems.

I questioned this because, in my 18 years as a dental hygienist, I’ve seen evidence of excessive fluoride ingestion on people’s teeth and I know how brown patches on a teen’s teeth can affect their mental health. I know if people use formula to feed their baby I’m to advise against use of tap water. It can contain 250 times more than nature passes on through breast milk.

I know there are places like China and India where the naturally occurring fluoride in water is crippling bones and has destroyed teeth. Only eight countries in the world actually fluoridate tap water. The citizens of these countries also have the distinction of having the highest rates of arthritis and thyroid disease, both side effects of excessive ingestion of fluoride.

Dr. Hardy Limebeck, past president of the Canadian Association of Dental Research, has publicly spoken out about their scientific findings, revealing that it’s not necessary to be ingested, that its purpose is better served when applied directly to the tooth.

Dr. Paul Connett, professor emeritus in Chemistry at St. Lawrence College in Caton, N.Y. is another scientist who has spoken out publicly against the need to put fluoride in municipal water.

So my natural inclination is to encourage people to improve their oral health by daily care, including brushing two to three times per day, with a soft toothbrush and floss at least once.

Watching what and when you eat is important as well.

A dental professional is well-positioned to assess the risk of decay and whether there is a need for fluoride. But I’m still on the fence about the “safety” of ingesting it.

Michelle Black, RDH, Confident Smiles Independent Dental Hygiene, Ottawa

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/news/ottawa/Some+questions+about+safety+ingesting+fluoride/7461653/story.html

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 28-Oct-2012

Wichita fluoride fight has long roots, passionate advocates

By: Dion Lefler, The Wichita Eagle, Kansas.com, Wichita, Kansas 27-Oct-2012

Set aside the science lessons. The fight over fluoride is as much or more a clash of philosophy.

As Wichitans decide whether to add the cavity-fighting chemical to their city’s drinking water, the two sides in the campaign for the Nov. 6 election are pounding away at each other with rhetorical clubs labeled “public good” and “freedom of choice.”

On one side are almost all the city’s doctors and dentists, dismayed by what they see as needless suffering in the patients who come to them with preventable dental decay. They gathered more than 11,000 signatures on an initiative petition that forced the City Council, which had avoided taking a stand on fluoride, to put it to a public vote.

They’ve been met with an equally passionate campaign by fluoride foes who see it as a dangerous forced medication. They see fluoridation as a case of government overstepping its bounds and taking over what they believe should be a matter of personal choice.

Both sides accuse the other of trying to deceive the public to win the election.

The anti-fluoride troops say the dentists and doctors are either ignoring or hiding the real risks of fluoridation to facilitate sales of fluoride, a by-product of the industrial process for making phosphate fertilizer.

The pro-fluoride side says 60 years of track record, 3,000 studies and the experience of three-fourths of Americans has proven fluoridation is an effective and safe way to strengthen everybody’s teeth. And they say the anti-fluoride group is either misunderstanding or willfully distorting science.

The pediatrician

Wichita pediatrician Larry Hund said he grew up in Wichita and loves his city, but it sure can be frustrating to try to get something done.

“I’m kind of actually disappointed that there’s that many people who don’t have that community spirit I see and hear in other communities,” Hund said. “I have two daughters in Omaha and when I’m up there I see so many more progressive things happening and it’s people doing things for the community, for the good of the community.”

Part of the problem as he sees it is lack of vision and leadership.

“It seems like in Wichita it just takes us forever for anything to get done,” he said. “I know the City Council just wants to keep everybody happy but I think at some point you have to say ‘Well, this is what’s good for the community, let’s get together and do it.’ ”

Hund sees fluoridation as a health issue primarily, but also a matter of economics and social justice.

“About a third of the children in Wichita, they don’t have parents who have insurance or the kind of incomes where they can buy the fluoride tablets to make sure the kids have healthy teeth. Those fluoride tablets, from 3 to 13 years of age, it’s 10 years worth of tablets and it may just be $4 to $6 a month or something like that, but it adds up and it’s hard to do that being a parent.

“To help our people who are a little bit less fortunate to bring themselves up in the community and achieve better things, I think we as a community should help those people and I think oral health is a big factor in that. It is true when they go to get a job at 18 or 20 or whatever their age is, I think oral health makes a difference as far as how you present yourself and how confident you are.

“I’m a native Wichitan and you can tell by my teeth. I’ve got a filling in every one of my molars and I have to go and get my fourth crown here in another month or so because I’ve got a cracked tooth where there was a filling. That’s going to be $1,000 or thereabouts for a crown. Not everybody can afford that. To take away something that every other community bigger than us does — and it’s kind of a given thing they don’t even think twice about — I think those people are looking after their community.”

But Hund said he thinks distrust of government has become so ingrained in the opposition to fluoride that it’s difficult to impossible to have a rational public discourse on the merits of the plan at hand.

“I think it’s under the disguise of medical problems and things like that, but I think a lot of them, they really don’t want the government messing with their water and they want to be able to do what they want to do with their water and so forth. They just don’t see the value to the community.

“I love this community. I chose to come back here and practice and I love the people, but it’s really frustrating to deal with a subject like this, or like with the landfill issues or recycling issues. There’s always something where we just can’t get together and do something for the common good. And I think it detracts from the community.”

The activist

Mark Gietzen has been many things in Wichita politics. He’s served as chairman of the county Republican Party and longtime president of the conservative Kansas Republican Assembly.

As president of the Kansas Coalition for Life, he organized years of daily protest at the clinic of the late Dr. George Tiller, until the abortion provider was shot to death by an anti-abortion activist in 2009.

Gietzen has thrown himself heart and soul into the anti-fluoride movement, organizing meetings, wrangling volunteers, printing and distributing thousands of fliers and mining the Internet for evidence that fluoride is harmful.

“I’m a very strong believer that the government has absolutely no right to put a medication in my body that I don’t want and in fact that I know is going to cause trouble with multiple organs in my body and probably does no good or very little good for my teeth. I flat absolutely don’t want that,” Gietzen said. “I am 100 percent angered by the audacity of somebody thinking they can give me a treatment, No. 1 that’s not proven safe, and that they’re going to medicate me without my permission — and I don’t need or want or desire and don’t want to pay for it – that is the ultimate example of government putting themselves in a place where they should not be.

“I am absolutely proud to be an American. I’m absolutely one who thinks that every human being should have a right to make their own decisions (and) as long as my decision doesn’t hurt you, then I should have the freedom of choice to make my own decision. By golly if I want to go out buy a tube of toothpaste and swallow it all and die from it, so be it. My life, freedom of choice.”

Gietzen said one of the main things that bothers him about fluoride is that once it’s in the water, it’s extraordinarily difficult to get it out.

“The only way you can separate the fluoride from the water is either through distillation or reverse osmosis,” he said. “When you have like X parts per million and you put it in your carbon filter and you look what comes out, it’s cleaned up everything, taken the iron out, it’s taken all the other minerals out of the water and … guess what, it doesn’t even reduce it (fluoride). It’s exactly what you put in in parts per million.

“Even if you stop drinking it and you spend $2,000 or $3,000 to get a reverse osmosis filter system so you’ve got some pure water to drink, then you’ve taken a loss in that you’ve lost all the good minerals … then you’re going to have to take mineral supplements to make up for that.”

And he absolutely rejects the contention that fluoridation would improve public health.

“We don’t agree with the ‘public good’ side,” Gietzen said. “There’s no proof that fluoride does any good. It certainly does less good than xylitol gum. If somebody’s out there trying to be a do-gooder and medicate me without my permission, then they should be trying to force me to chew xylitol gum because that stops 70 percent of the cavities and the best, most outlandish unproven thing the fluoride people come up with is a 40 percent reduction in cavities.

“The driving force behind this is not health of the people, it’s to sell the doggone product, that’s what it is.”

The politics

As a battle over big government, the fluoride fight is not without some small ironies.

One is that the regulation of fluoride in drinking water is primarily a responsibility of private-sector organizations, not the government.

The Centers for Disease Control, a government agency, adopted guidelines suggesting the optimal levels of fluoridation, but the rest is left up to nongovernmental entities.

The American Water Works Association, a nongovernment nonprofit group, sets the engineering and operational guidelines for fluoridation systems, to ensure local agencies get the right concentration of the chemical into their water, said Paul Olson, the group’s director of standards.

The association works in concert with the NSF, formerly the National Sanitation Foundation, another nongovernmental group that sets the standards for the purity of the fluoride that goes into the water supply, and works with manufacturers to make sure those standards are met, he said.

Another irony is that if fluoridation does come to Wichita, it will in spite of government, not because of it.

Wichita has rejected fluoridation several times in the past, both in the City Commission (later City Council) chambers and in public votes.

Since the last big fluoride flare-up in 1978, City Councils have avoided the issue.

This time, reluctant council members were dragged into addressing the issue. The citizens’ petition drive forced them, by state law, to either adopt fluoridation or put it on the election ballot.

Only one council member, Janet Miller, argued to adopt the ordinance outright. But she eventually made the motion and joined the unanimous vote to put it to a vote.

The history

The limited-government fervor which is partly driving the anti-fluoride movement is a staple of Wichita’s political life, said Ken Ciboski, professor of political science at Wichita State University and longtime observer of and participant in local Republican politics.

It’s been that way for a long time, going back to at least the Red Scare of the 1950s, Ciboski said.

“I think it comes back to what Wichita seems to be all about,” Ciboski said. “After all, wasn’t one of the founders of the John Birch Society located here? Fred Koch. Really, Wichita was kind of a hotbed of kind of a different kind of radicalism in a way.”

Koch, who founded what is now Koch Industries, did not start the John Birch Society but was an early member of the council that advised founder Robert Welch, according to the society. The Birch Society had long faded from view, but is in the midst of a comeback. In the 1950s and ’60s, it was a powerful movement in Kansas, fighting what its members saw as an international communist conspiracy to control America through expanding government powers.

The Birch Society also was a leading opponent of fluoridation, which started in the 1940s and picked up steam through the ’50s and ’60s.

The John Birch Society was an active participant in Wichita’s 1964 referendum that repealed fluoridation after the City Commission had voted to implement it.

The opposition was led by a dentist who was a member of the Birch Society, who argued that fluoridation was mass medication for a non-communicable disease, a violation of individual rights.

During that debate, some opponents labeled the pro-fluoridation forces as “tools of the Communists” and one anti-fluoride publication asked: “Shall we give the Communists the machinery and the materials to destroy us by simply opening a valve in our water supply?”

The Jaycees, who supported fluoride, held a news conference complaining that supporters’ patriotism was being questioned. Fluoridation was defeated, 31,415 to 18,749.Except for the comments about communism, today’s debates for and against fluoride echo almost word-for-word the speeches delivered by the protagonists half a century ago.

Ciboski said he’s not surprised to see local fluoride history repeat itself.

“Wichita, it seems to me, is kind of peculiar in a way about a lot of things, and this is one of them,” he said.

http://www.kansascity.com/2012/10/27/3888004/fluoride-fight-has-long-roots.html

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 27-Oct-2012

Fluoridation facts

By: David Shaw (Letter to the Editor) KearneyHub.com, Kearney, Nebraska 27-Oct-2012

I would like to inject a few terms and ideas into the vernacular of the citizens of Kearney related to a health concern with the city’s water. Water fluoridation is a medical practice that was grandfathered into acceptable norms of modern society before the inception of the Federal Drug Administration.

To be straightforward, my concerns reside in the fact that despite the efforts of proponents for fluoridation in propounding the safety and effectiveness of fluoridation practices, humanity’s advancements in health have brought an increased awareness of the potential detriments of such a substance.

Just this year a major study at Harvard University indicated in Environmental Health Perspectives, a federal government medical journal, that their “results support the possibility of adverse effects of fluoride exposures on children’s neurodevelopment” and that, “The children in high fluoride areas had significantly lower IQ than those who lived in low fluoride areas.”

Also, in 1977, Dr. Dean Burk, head of the Cytochemistry Section at the National Cancer Institute, revealed that fluoride levels of even 1 ppm, which are equal to that of Kearney’s municipal water supply, caused tumor growth to accelerate 25 percent faster, created melatonic tumors, and even mutated normal cells into cancer cells.

Furthermore, there are a multitude of countries that have outright banned the substance. Are we missing something here? I have researched the subject and have contacted the Kearney City Council and the mayor to emphatically state my concerns. I feel the citizens of Kearney must hold themselves responsible for consideration of the subject and the process of agreeing to remove or maintain the addition of hydrofluosilicic acid to our water supply.

http://www.kearneyhub.com/news/opinion/fluoridation-facts/article_6482b818-1fef-11e2-8d1b-0019bb2963f4.html

 

Dentists admit to violation during 2010 fluoride debate

By: Brian Caldwell, Record staff, The Record.com, Kitchener, Ontario 27-Oct-2012

A bitter court battle stemming from the 2010 fluoride referendum in Waterloo ended quietly Friday with a minor admission of wrongdoing by the Ontario Dental Association.

The association pleaded guilty in a Kitchener courtroom to failing to register as a referendum participant before incurring “minor expenses” related to a public forum on the controversial issue.

That technically violated election financing rules under the Ontario Municipal Act.

Similar charges against two dentists who took part in the June 2010 forum — Dr. Harry Hoediono and Dr. Ira Kirshen — were withdrawn after the association itself admitted guilt.

The association was given a suspended sentence and did not receive a fine or any other penalty.

The charges were laid privately by activist Robert Fleming, who led a successful effort to remove fluoride from the city’s drinking water. A prosecutor later took up and pursued the case.

The dental association urged continued fluoridation as a public health measure to prevent cavities.

Residents of Waterloo voted 50.3 per cent in favour of ending fluoridation and city politicians respected the referendum results by doing so.

The legal fight between Fleming and the association included allegations of intimidation and smear tactics.

Fleming said the association’s guilty plea means justice has been “partially served.”

http://www.therecord.com/news/local/article/824999–dentists-admit-to-violation-during-2010-fluoride-debate

 

Ontario Dental Association has pleaded guilty to illegal campaigning


CTV News Southwestern Ontario (26-Oct-2012, 1 min. 54 sec.)

 


Region of Waterloo, Ontario, 26-Oct-2012
The Ontario Dental Association pled guilty to promoting the use of ‘fluoride’ in Waterloo’s drinking water without registering to do so… The ODA pled guilty to breaching Ontario municipal election laws in 2010.

 

Full Media Statement issued by Robert J. Fleming, 26-Oct-2012 — “This case focused on ensuring that participants to the municipal democratic process adhered to the law when campaigning during the 2010 Region of Waterloo fluoridation referendum.

Democracy is something most of us hold dear. As such, most people understand the inappropriateness of allowing a large lobby group to simply do and spend as they please, while campaigning in a municipal election/referendum.

In the interest of holding just one such referendum, paid for by municipal tax dollars, charges against the Ontario Dental Association were sworn out early during the municipal campaign. I am pleased that the ODA pled guilty to the charges as laid. Local municipal democratic process was successfully protected.

Over these last two years, both in and out of court, the ODA tried unsuccessfully to impugn the charges brought against them. They argued the charges were without merit, intimidation tactics, and an abuse of the judiciary. Only when the evidence and merits of the case were about to be heard, did the ODA then stand down and plead guilty. They did so without any show of remorse.  Not even an apology to the Waterloo community. Yet, they benefit from a suspended sentence through their well-timed admission of guilt.

While justice was partially served, I suspect the ODA leaders remain as arrogant and evasive today as they were during the campaign two years ago.”

 

L’Association des dentistes de l’Ontario a plaidé coupable d’avoir enfreint la Loi électorale de l’Ontario en  faisant la promotion de la fluoration lors d’un référendum sur la cessation de la fluoration à Waterloo, ON sans s’être inscrit pour faire campagne pour la promotion de la fluoration.  L’Association se pensait au-dessus de la loi…  Le président de COF-COF, M. Robert J. Fleming a déposé cette plainte en 2010.

 

SEE RELATED ARTICLE: http://cof-cof.ca/2012/10/ontario-dental-association-pleads-guilty-in-case/

SEE RELATED ARTICLE: http://cof-cof.ca/2012/11/oda-continues-to-support-water-fluoridation-re-oda-pleads-guilty-in-case-oct-31-waterloo-chronicle/

SEE RELATED NEWS VIDEO: http://cof-cof.ca/2011/12/controversy-over-last-falls-referendum-on-the-fluoridation-of-water-in-waterloo-ontario-made-its-way-to-court-this-morning/

SEE RELATED CARTOON: http://cof-cof.ca/cartoon-public-voice-and-dental-association/

 

 

 

 

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 26-Oct-2012

Dental Association pleads guilty in fluoride case

By: CTV News, Kitchener, Ontario 26-Oct-2012

The Ontario Dental Association has pleaded guilty to allegations election laws were violated ahead of the municipal vote in October 2010.

At the time the ODA was lobbying to maintain fluoridation of the City of Waterloo’s drinking water, which was the subject of a referendum question on the ballot.

However, prosecutors filed a case claiming the group was not registered to campaign on the issue, which is a violation of Ontario’s Municipal Elections Act.

The association was given a suspended sentence on Friday, and wasn’t fined.

Robert Fleming, a Waterloo resident and head of Waterloo Watch, was the person who brought the allegations against the ODA to the attention of a Crown prosecutor.

In a statement released following the court proceedings, he said “In the interest of having just one fluoridation referendum, charges against the Ontario Dental Association were sworn out early during the campaign period, and I am pleased the ODA plead guilty to the charges as laid.  Local municipal democratic process was successfully protected.”

In a statement to CTV News, the ODA said it decided to move past the issue, and not take up any more court time, by entering the plea.

“The people of Ontario should be assured that the ODA will continue to advocate on behalf of the public when it comes to their health and well-being. The association will continue our work to educate the public about the benefit of community water fluoridation because in the right amount it is both safe and effective.”

Voters narrowly rejected continuing to fluoridate Waterloo’s water, with 50.3 per cent voting to end the practice. Dentists then appealed to city councillors to reject the decision.

Additional charges against two dentists, Dr. Harry Hoediono and Dr. Ira Kirshen were dropped.

http://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/dental-association-pleads-guilty-in-fluoride-case-1.1012370#ixzz2AWVKnLi0

Brewer’s ‘Daily Dose’ 25-Oct-2012

Great fluoride debate

By: RedDeerExpress.com, Red Deer, Alberta 24-Oct-2012

Little else gets people as wound up as the debate over fluoride in the City’s drinking water. Those on both sides of the issue have plenty of information onhand to provide their case, which leaves many wondering what indeed is the best direction for the City to take in this matter.

Fluoride has long been used as a preventative measure against tooth decay, and overall oral health. Many dentists are in favour of the practice as are many government departments of health. But there have always been those who insist that there are too many risks involved with swallowing fluoride to human health.

Next week, City council will debate the fluoride issue and the options of what to do about it — to eliminate it, keep it or reduce the amount of fluoride in the local water supply or put the question to the public in the form of a plebiscite during the 2013 municipal election.

Red Deer started fluoridating its water in about 1957 after a plebiscite in favour of the move. The City currently spends about $60,000 a year to add the controversial chemical to City water. Right now, the City adds fluoride to its water supply in a concentration of less than 0.7 mg/L per the guidelines set out by Health Canada. The City is legally required to continue this practice until administration is directed, by City council, to apply for an amendment to its operating approval.

Ultimately, it really should be up to the public as to whether they wish to ingest fluoride every time they take a drink of water.

We think there has been enough public discussion that leans towards removing fluoride, so we believe that’s the way council should base its decision as well.

A plebiscite would also work to bring an end to this issue once and for all. But these days, the mood seems to be pointing towards getting rid of it.

One only has to look around the world to see the common trend towards fluoride removal from water – Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Finland, and Japan are some of the countries that put a stop to the practice years ago. Obviously these countries aren’t stuck in the middle ages in terms of their knowledge about this practice. It really causes one to think that there is likely much more to the issue than what common knowledge may provide.

After all, if people want more fluoride to ward off cavities, they can simply brush their teeth or use their favourite mouthwash.

If they don’t want to have it in their drinking water, they shouldn’t have to always avoid the tap and buy bottled water in their own community to avoid it.

http://www.reddeerexpress.com/opinion/Great_fluoride_debate_175602941.html

Letter to the Editor: Fluoride concern

By: Spencer Moore (Letter to the Editor), TulsaWorld.com, Tulsa, Oklahoma 25-Oct-2012

My name is Spencer Moore, I am 12 years old and I’m a Boy Scout in Troop 26 of Tulsa. Recently I read an article about fluoride and the harm it can cause. I was very surprised to find out that fluoride is in lots of things that we consume every day, besides our water that we drink.

Studies have shown that fluoride can cause lots of health problems, like cancer, and can disrupt the immune system. This is just to name a few things. They have also said that fluoride does not stop tooth decay. I contacted Jeff Green, the national director of Citizens for Safe Drinking Water, and he says that it is a huge concern that we do not have labels stating the amount of fluoride that we are consuming in our daily diet.

Have you ever investigated this for Tulsa?  Yours in Scouting,

http://www.tulsaworld.com/opinion/article.aspx?subjectid=62&articleid=20121025_62_A16_Myname974607&allcom=1